Archive for Joe Flach

College Football Crisis Management Award – Week 2

The early season schedules for college football often include many games which appear, on paper, to be lopsided affairs.  There are quite a number of FCS opponents that share the fields with their much larger and more powerful FBS brethren; and, many schools from the, so-called, Big 5 conferences schedule plenty of home games against, what should be, weaker teams from the mid-major and lower conferences.  As a result, there are more games on the schedule with at least one FBS team participating; there are more ho-hum games with run-away scores; and, there are more games in which one team never trailed at any point in the game.  It’s kinda-sorta like the college football version of pre-season football or spring training baseball.  But … not for everyone.

Sometimes, those early season patsies don’t follow the script and put quite a scare into their bigger brother teams … and, sometimes, even steal a rather embarrassing win from them.  And, you do get those big-time, top 25, or even top 10, match-ups sprinkled in the schedule to keep things interesting.  This is what makes college football so fun from the first kickoff to the last.  And, that is what the 2014 College Football Week 2 schedule had in store for us.

The 2014 Week 2 slate included a total of 74 games with at least one FBS football team on the field.  Of those 74 games, 43 (or 58%) of them were won by teams that led throughout the entire game.  Only 9 of those games were won by the visiting team.  A few of those games were relatively highly anticipated contests between big-time football programs, like: Virginia Tech’s 35 – 21 victory over Ohio State; and, Notre Dame’s 31 – 0 dismantling of Michigan.  That psssssssttttttt you heard this weekend was the air being let out of the Big Ten’s conference bravado balloon.

Of the 31 games in which the ultimate winner trailed by at least 1 point or more at some time in the game, 13 of those games were won by the visiting team.  And, of those 31 games with some sort of comeback involved, 9 games (4 visiting teams and 5 home teams) overcame deficits of 10 points or more.

Three winning teams trailed in their game by 10 points at one time:  Wyoming, in their 17 – 13 victory over Air Force; Iowa in their 17 – 13 win over Ball State; and, Illinois in a 42 – 34 victory over Western KentuckyDuke, NC State and Colorado each had to come back after trailing by 11 points against Troy, Old Dominion and Massachusetts, respectively.  North Carolina had to overcome a 2 touchdown, 14 point, deficit before pulling off the win against San Diego State.  And, Kansas State was down by 15 points against Iowa State before notching their victory.  But, no team overcame a larger deficit than our Week 2 Safe Harbor Consulting College Football Crisis Management Award winner.

And the winner is … New Mexico State!

After spotting Georgia State a 17 – 0 lead early in the 2nd quarter, the Aggies outscored the Panthers 34 – 14 to come away with a 34 – 31 victory.  New Mexico State rallied from behind to take the lead in the 4th quarter, 27 – 24, but Georgia State managed to get the lead back, 31 – 27 with only 2 minutes and 30 seconds left on the scoreboard clock.  The Aggies secured the victory and their notoriety as the Safe Harbor Consulting College Football Crisis Management Award winner for Week 2 by scoring the winning touchdown on an 11 yard pass from Tyler Rogers to Teldrick Morgan with just 15 seconds left in the game.

Congratulations, New Mexico State Aggies!

Certificate - Week 2 - New Mexico State

You can read our Week 1 Report by clicking here.

College Football Crisis Management Award – Week 1

Safe Harbor Consulting is happy to announce the beginning of our 2nd Annual College Football Crisis Management Awards program.  The Safe Harbor Consulting College Football Crisis Management Award recognizes the largest comeback of the week for NCAA football games that include at least one FBS football team.

So, without further ado, our Week 1 report.

The first week of College Football 2014 stretched from Wednesday to Monday over the Labor Day holiday weekend.  The slate of games included 84 contests with at least one FBS opponent.  Of those 84 contests, 54 were won by teams that never trailed in the game.  In those 54 games, 12 of the winning teams were the visitors and 42 of those games were won by the home team – not very hospitable of them, don’t you think?

In 30 Week 1 games, the eventual winner trailed by at least one point or more at some point in the contest.  In 10 games, the winning team had to overcome a double-digit deficit before notching the victory.  Three of the ten winning teams that overcame double-digit deficits were visiting teams and seven were won by the home team.

Washington, Colorado State and UL Monroe each had to overcome 10 point deficits before winning their contests against Hawaii, Colorado and Wake Forest, respectively.  South Florida and Toledo each trailed by 11 points before pulling out their victories over Western Carolina and New Hampshire.  Three teams – NC State, North Dakota State and Tulsa – trailed by 2 full touchdowns, 14 points, before rallying for the victory against, Georgia Southern, Iowa State and Tulane.  And, Central Michigan defeated Chattanooga after Chattanooga scored the first 16 points of the game.  But, no team came back from a bigger deficit than our Week 1 Safe Harbor Consulting College Football Crisis Management Award winner!

And the winner is … LSU.

In one of Week 1’s premier football games, between two Top 25 ranked football teams, Louisiana State University (LSU) managed to come back and win after trailing Wisconsin by 17 points midway through the 3rd quarter.  LSU scored the final 21 points in the game to win by a score of 28 – 24 and secure the first Safe Harbor Consulting College Football Crisis Management Award for 2014.

What a terrific way to start off the season.  Most of the awards from our first year were won by teams outside of the Top 25.  To have such a high profile game garner the first award for 2014 is truly special.

Congratulations to the Bayou Bengals on their impressive come from behind victory.  We can hardly wait for Week 2!

Certificate - Week 1 - LSU

The Business Continuity Planning Objective (Hint: It’s not to implement the BCP Methodology)

So, I was recently helping a colleague prepare a management presentation to discuss her plans for advancing the business continuity program in her company.  Maybe it’s just a matter of semantics, but we had a lengthy discussion over “objectives”, “goals” and “tasks”.

If you have read any of my recent blogs you might recognize a pattern in which I think business continuity planners have become victims of our own methodology.  This discussion helped me to emphasize that point.  When I suggested to my colleague that she should first succinctly define her objective, she merely listed the steps of the methodology.  I strongly disagree.

A business continuity planner’s objective is not to complete the BCP methodology.  The methodology is simply a recipe towards achieving an end.  What is that “end” you hope to achieve?  That “end” is your ultimate objective.

So, we started with: “To provide the company a means in which they can recover from (or continue operations through) any business interruption event that impacts their operations, facilities, employees or workflow.”  I am sure you can improve on this sentence, but, it is a good start – and, it helps set the right mind frame.  Regardless of what any auditor thinks or what any other professional has led you to believe (especially those with a vested interest in having you follow a given methodology), the business continuity planner’s job is not to execute the BCP methodology; your job is to prepare your organization to successfully respond to, continue critical operations through, and recover from a business interruption event.

Now, it just so happens that one of the best ways to achieve that objective is to follow the standard methodology, but, with this understanding of our ultimate objective we can better assess what components of the methodology are needed for our situation and determine what, if any, adjustments to the methodology we need to make to achieve this objective for our particular company.  We simply need to ask ourselves – about each component in the methodology – is this needed and how is it best used to achieve our objective?

With this thought in mind, I like to reorganize the standard methodology a bit and divide the components of the methodology into the Strategic Planning Components and the Tactical Planning Components.  Strategic Planning Components of the methodology help us define “what” our program should accomplish and the Tactical Planning Components help us describe “how” we accomplish these strategic goals.  The diagram here depicts this re-organization of the methodology.  (Click on the diagram for a better view.)

Methodology

If you think about the BCP methodology as a recipe for baking a cake, the Strategic Planning Components are needed to decide what kind of cake we should bake, how big it should be, what ingredients are needed to bake it and how long it should take to bake it.  The Tactical Planning Components are needed to ensure we have access to everything we need when the time comes to bake the cake, and, have the instructions for actually baking the cake when it is required.  The methodology also suggests we practice baking this cake a time or two before having to serve it for real – a good idea if you have never baked a cake before – and, making whatever adjustments are needed to constantly improve the cake and the baking process.

Now we get to a question that is becoming a topic of conversation for many business continuity planners: if the Strategic Planning Components of the methodology help us define what kind and how much cake we should bake, are they necessary if this is told to us by our management team?

This is where I think we often fall victim to our methodology.  I think we must ask ourselves – who is our customer?  Who are we designing business continuity programs for?  The methodology is not our customer.  The auditors are not our customers.  The CEO and/or Board of Directors are our customers.  In my mind, the key phrase in every BCP/Disaster Recovery/Emergency Response regulatory requirement is the one that states these plans/programs must be consistent with management expectations and approved by the Board of Directors.

I think that if Senior Management dictates the strategy to the business continuity planner and then approves the solutions put in place to achieve those strategic objectives, it is less important that you can tick off having performed every task within the BCP Methodology – even if not being able to do so upsets the auditors.  Furthermore, the business continuity planner who follows every step of the methodology to the letter and implements a solution that is not consistent with management’s expectations – has not done their job.

At the end of the day, the business continuity planner must ensure that their organization is in position to effectively and efficiently respond to and recover from any business interruption that impacts their organization.  I say, if you can achieve that – you have done your job, with or without having completed the entire BCP methodology.  Now, some will challenge and say that short of actually experiencing a disaster, the only real way to ensure that you have achieved this objective is to complete every step of the methodology.  I believe that the real proof is in the design and execution of the exercises and tests you perform.  That, to me, is the real challenge – good, complete and verifiable exercises.

But, my real objective for writing this blog is not to convince anyone that they shouldn’t follow the BCP methodology.  I think, in almost every case, even following my theory here, you will eventually determine that the standard BCP methodology is the best means for getting your job done.  I just wish to get business continuity planners to understand what their ultimate objective is and not to simply follow the methodology because they think they have to but to understand why they are following the methodology and help ensure that everything they do – every step they follow in the methodology – can be tied back to achieving this ultimate objective.  In this way, I believe, you can design your implementation of the methodology in a way that does not waste anyone’s time and effort in gathering information or conducting analyses that do not contribute to the final objective.

I think my colleague got the point and her management presentation was well received.  So, I think, I can count at least one practitioner that now sees my point.

Business Objectives vs Business Continuity Objectives – The Missing Step

This blog article talks about a step in the Business Continuity Planning (BCP) Methodology that I think is missing – and, I happen to think it is a pretty important step.

One of the greatest challenges in the BCP methodology is in establishing the program’s recovery objectives.  Whether you label them as Maximum Acceptable Downtime (MAD); Recovery Time and Recovery Point Objectives (RTO & RPO); or some other creative anagram unique to your process, these program benchmarks are usually arrived at through a Business Impact Analysis (BIA) process or, at least, through some survey/interview with business managers and subject matter experts to establish what the critical business processes are; what timeframes they must be recovered; and what resources must be available in certain timeframes to enable our continuity or recovery of those processes.  Does this sound familiar?  I’m I right, so far?

But – you knew there was going to be a but – to achieve what end?  I mean, we do a great job defining business continuity objectives, but do we do so against established business objectives?

I always thought that the savvy business manager, when asked to complete a BIA questionnaire would ask the question, “What is Senior Management expecting me to achieve during the business interruption period?”  Sometimes, I think, we get close.  Many times I hear business continuity planning professionals say that the objective is to “survive” the disaster or “keep the company solvent”.  But do we ever define what that means – in business objective terms?

So, forget about operating in disaster situations for a second.  Just think about business as usual objectives.  Most every company and most every department within each company has established business or performance objectives.  There are defined revenue targets, income objectives, margin targets, production objectives, etc.  There are expected number of widgets to produce per week; sales targets; number of calls handled per hour; items sold; and so on and so on.

What I would want to know, if I were the business manager being asked what my critical processes are and how long can we go without performing those processes, is:  What adjustments are being made to my performance objectives during this incident you are asking me to plan for?  Am I expected to still achieve my revenue target, sales target, income target, margin targets?  Am I still being measured against growth?  How many widgets per day am I expected to still crank out?  If you can tell me what my management is expecting me to produce during this contingency period, I can then tell you what I need to do, when I need to do it and what I need to get it done.

Seems to me, we miss that step.  We make middle management guess at what our business targets are.  And, furthermore, we never ensure that their guesses are consistent with one another.  Each individual manager who completes the BIA makes their own assumptions about what the overall business objectives are during a business interruption event.  Seems a bit risky to me.

I understand why and how this happens.  It is primarily because middle management is more accessible in our planning process.  It is much easier to include middle management in the planning process, feed them the BIA questions and get them to assign MADs, RTOs and RPOs than it is to include Senior Management in the process.  But – there’s that damn word again – how can we really define viable business continuity objectives if we don’t first know our business objectives during time of an event?

I wonder what would happen if we tried?  I wonder … what if you posed that question to upper management?  What if we added that step in our BCP Methodology:  Define adjusted business objectives that must be achieved during a serious business interruption event.  IN BUSINESS TERMS – not in BCP terms.  Interesting.

Anyway, just a thought.  What do you think?

The BIA Insult

So, I came across this quote the other day that someone was using in a presentation about the importance of conducting a Business Impact Analysis (BIA):

“A business continuity plan that is not predicated on or guided by the results of a business impact analysis (BIA) is, at best, guesswork, is incomplete, and may not function as it should during an actual recovery.”

Really?

I understand what they mean and I appreciate this message given to business continuity planners, but, I would hesitate saying this in a board room.  It may not be wise suggesting to the CEO and other senior executives that they do not know their business well enough to tell you what is important to them and what business processes are necessary to keep their organization solvent.

I have long since been of the opinion that business continuity planners have become victims of our own methodology.  I think many of us have lost sight of the why’s and wherefores of what we do and have become too caught up in the whats and how we do things.  And, I think, the BIA is a prime example of this.

Ultimately, why do we conduct a BIA?

I suggest that we perform a BIA to establish the objectives for our Business Continuity program.  We gather and analyze the impacts of a business interruption in terms of financial impacts, reputational impacts, operational impacts, legal and regulatory impacts and other impacts unique to our company or industry.  Armed with this measurable and intangible information, we can make an educated and informed decision about what business processes we need to continue – and, in what timeframe – to minimize our losses and keep the organization solvent following some sort of devastating business interruption event.

I like to break down the standard Business Continuity Methodology into the Strategic Planning Phases and the Tactical Planning Phases.  The Strategic Planning Phases consists of the Risk Analysis, Business Impact Analysis, Recovery Requirements Analysis and Cost Benefits Analysis of viable solutions.  The Strategic Planning part of the methodology helps us define “what” our business continuity plan should achieve.  The Tactical Planning Phases of the methodology define “how” we achieve our objectives.  This includes, implementing the chosen solutions and documenting the policies, plans and procedures.

But, I don’t believe the Business Continuity Planner is always needed to define the Strategy.  I think, in some instances, the “strategy” can be given to us by the CEO, board or other executive management team members.

What if the CEO told you what business processes they want to continue, in what time frames?  Are you going to tell him/her that that would be creating a BCP based, at best, on guesswork?

I know that the methodologies say we MUST CONDUCT a BIA.  But, I think that that requirement is a little bit tangled up.  I think it is absolutely correct to say, before you can  successfully implement a viable and effective business continuity plan you must establish your recovery time and recovery point objectives; you must identify and categorize your business processes in terms of criticality and importance to the sustainability of the organization and the ability to satisfy the corporate mission; you must know the dependencies and requirements that support those critical processes to ensure a complete and holistic recovery solution – but, I am not sure a BIA is always what is needed to get these “strategic” parameters.

Yes, I have been in many a situation where the leadership team was not comfortable in establishing these objectives without the support of information gathered and analyzed through an in-depth BIA.  I have also seen many a business continuity planning team chastised for spending months on gathering and analyzing information simply to conclude in telling management teams what they already knew.  And, I have seen business continuity programs fail at time of an event because they were predicated on the findings from a BIA that were never verified and matched against management’s expectations, which were significantly different from what the information gathered suggested.

Now, I am not against BIAs.  I have made a nice living by conducting many a BIA over the past 20 years, and I do believe they are valuable and necessary tools – just not in every case.    I caution business continuity planners not to become so married to the methodology that you lose sight of what the objectives are for each methodology component.  If the objective of a BIA is to establish the continuity and recovery objectives of your business continuity program and the executive team in your company knows and are willing to sign off on recovery and continuity objectives that are given to you – do you really need to conduct the BIA?

In any case, I don’ think I would ever suggest that a business continuity plan not based on the findings from a BIA is guesswork, especially if the guesses are coming from the Executive Management Team.  I just know that if you came into my company and told me that a team of business continuity planning specialists are needed to identify what our critical processes are, I would be showing you to the front door.

Week 13 – Pro Football Crisis Management Award Winners

Week 13 in the NFL included a full slate of 16 games with three games on Thursday (Thanksgiving), twelve on Sunday and one Monday night.  Sixteen games gives us more of a chance for come-from-behind victories and, hopefully, a good game to write about.  In Week 13, we actually had four of them!

WEEK 13 RECAP

Of the 16 games played in the NFL Week 13, 10 games were won by teams that trailed at one point or another in the game.  Of those 10 games 6 were won by teams that found themselves down by 10 or more points at one time during the game.  Of those 6 teams that overcame double-digit deficits, 4 of them were visiting teams.

For the third time this year and the first time since Week 8, there were multiple teams tied for the Safe Harbor Consulting Pro Football Crisis Management Award.  Four teams overcame a deficit of 14 points in Week 13 to win the award.  If you have 4 winners do you really have a winner?  Well, for this award – yes.  You have four winners.

OAKLAND VS DALLAS

OAK DALIn the traditional Thanksgiving Day football game in Dallas, the 6 – 5 Cowboys were hosting the 4 – 7 Oakland Raiders.  The Cowboys were looking to keep pace with the Philadelphia Eagles in the NFC East while the Raiders were trying to keep their slim AFC playoff hopes alive.  With the smell of turkey looming in the house, I sat down to watch this traditional game thankful for my wide-screen TV (and many other, less materialistic, blessings in my life).

This game got off to a wild start as Dallas fumbled the opening kickoff and the Oakland Raiders’ Greg Jenkins scooped the ball up and ran in for a 23 yard touchdown return.  Near the end of the first quarter, the Raiders returned the favor to Dallas and fumbled the ball on their own 2 yard line.  DeMarco Murray then ran in from 2 yards out to tie the score at 7 – 7.

In the second quarter, Oakland put up two long scoring drives, each ending with a 1 yard Rashad Jennings touchdown run to go up by 14 at 21 – 7.  With under 2:00 to play in the half, the Cowboys put together a successful 2 minute drive and cut the lead in half on a DeMarco Murray 4 yard run up the middle.

The Cowboys tied things up in the third quarter on a 4 yard touchdown pass from Tony Romo to Dez Bryant and the teams entered the 4th quarter at 21 – 21 with the Cowboys moving the ball deep into Raiders’ territory and my wife yelling at me from the kitchen to come carve the turkey.

Two plays into the 4th quarter, the Cowboys finished off that drive with Murray’s third rushing touchdown on the day, from 7 yards out.  Having scored 21 unanswered points, the Cowboys were now on top by a score of 28 – 21.  Right at the 2 minute warning mark, the Cowboys’ Dan Bailey connected on a 19 yard field goal to put Dallas up by 10.  Sabastian Janikowski kicked a 45 yard field goal to bring the Raiders to within a touchdown with 35 seconds left in the game, but a failed onside kick attempt sealed their fate as the Cowboys won, 31 -24, after trailing by 14 earlier in the contest.

ATLANTA VS BUFFALO

ATL BUFThe Atlanta / Buffalo game featured two teams going nowhere fast in 2013 but playing for pride and roster spots in 2014.

The Bills raced out to a 14 – 0 lead by scoring touchdowns on their first two possessions of the game.  The first touchdown came on an EJ Manual 1 yard quarterback run around right end and the second one was a 4 yard Fred Jackson burst up the middle.  The Falcons cut the lead in half before the end of the 1st quarter on a Steven Jackson 27 yard run through a hole over left guard.

The Bills went back up by 10 in the 2nd quarter on a 29 yard field goal by Dan Carpenter, but the Falcons came back to tie things up at halftime 17 – 17.  The Falcons’ scores came on a 38 yard touchdown run my Antone Smith and a 49 yard Matt Bryant field goal as time ran out.

The Falcons took their first lead of the game in the third quarter on an 11 yard touchdown pass from Matt Ryan to Tony Gonzalez.  But, the Bills tied it back up at 24 – 24 on a 21 yard pass from Manual to Fred Jackson.

The Bills scored first in the 4th quarter on a C.J. Spiller 36 yard touchdown run, but the Falcons knotted it at 31 – 31 on a Steven Jackson 1 yard run to send the game into overtime.

The Bills got the ball first in overtime, but threw an interception on the second play from scrimmage.  Five plays later, Matt Bryant hit the game winning field goal from 36 yards out to give the Falcons the win after trailing 14 – 0 in the first quarter.

DENVER VS KANSAS CITY

DEN KCLast week, Denver was on the wrong side of the Safe Harbor Consulting Pro Football Crisis Management Award after blowing a 24 point lead against the pesky New England Patriots.  This week, the Broncos were visiting the Kansas City Chiefs in a battle for 1st place in the AFC West.

Each team’s first possession of the game ended with an interception by the other team.  Kansas City converted their turnover into a touchdown when Alex Smith hit Junior Hemmingway on a 17 yard touchdown pass.

Eric Decker’s 41 yard touchdown pass from Peyton Manning, early in the 2nd quarter, tied the score at 7 – 7.  It wouldn’t remain tied for long, however, as the Chief’s Knile Davis returned the pursuing kickoff back 108 yards for a touchdown.  After picking off Peyton Manning for the second time on the day, the Chief’s scored again on a Smith to Anthony Fasano 12 yard touchdown pass to go up by 14.  Of course, Peyton Manning is not one to let two interceptions get in his way and he got one touchdown back before the end of the half on a 3 yard touchdown pass to Knowshon Moreno.  The teams went into half time with the Chiefs on top 21 – 14.

The 3rd quarter belonged to the Broncos.  On the first possession of the half, Manning connected on another long touchdown pass to Eric Decker (this one, 37 yards) to tie the game up at 21.  After forcing the Chiefs to punt, Manning and Decker connected again from 15 yards out to put the Broncos up 28 – 21.

And, on the second play of the 4th quarter, the Manning to Decker combo struck for their 4th touchdown of the day on a 1 yard pass to put the Broncos on top by a score of 35 – 21, completing the Broncos run of 28 unanswered points.

Kansas City got back to within a touchdown on a late 4th quarter touchdown of their own – a Jamaal Charles 1 yard touchdown run – but, their last drive of the game, trying to tie the game up, stalled out on the Denver 13 after a 4th and 4 pass attempt fell incomplete.

One week after blowing a 24 point lead to New England, Denver found themselves winning a game in which they came from 14 points down to secure the victory.

NEW YORK GIANTS VS WASHINGTON

NYG WASThe last game of our four-way tie games for the Safe Harbor Consulting Pro Football Crisis Management Award featured the other Manning brother quarterback in another game of two teams simply fighting for some respectability in a frustrating 2013 campaign.  Capping off a long day of NFL Football, the 3 – 8 Washington Redskins were hosting the 4 – 7 New York Giants in a battle to stay out of last place in the NFC East.

The Redskins got the game started with a long, sustained, time consuming drive that resulted in a 1 yard Alfred Morris touchdown run and a 7 – 0 Redskins’ lead.  Early in the 2nd quarter, the Redskins added another touchdown on a Robert Griffin III 19 yard touchdown pass to Logan Paulsen to put Washington up by a score of 14 – 0.

The Giants, however, were able to tie the game at 14 – 14 before the end of the first half.  The first Giants’ touchdown came on Andre Brown 23 yard scamper around right end and the second touchdown was by way of an Eli Manning to Brandon Meyers 22 yard pass.

The only scoring in the 3rd quarter was on a 33 yard field goal by Kai Forbath that gave the Redskins a 17 – 14 lead.  But, the 4th quarter belonged to the Giants.  The Giants scored a go-ahead touchdown early in the 4th quarter on an Andre Brown 1 yard touchdown run and took a 7 point lead on a Josh Brown 39 yard field goal.  The Giants’ defense help the Redskins scoreless throughout the quarter and the Giants were able to avoid dropping into last place in the NFC East and win a share of the Week 14 Safe Harbor Consulting Pro Football Crisis Management Award by a score of 24 – 17.

SAFE HARBOR CONSULTING

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Week 12 – Winner  (To read the Week 12 article, click here.)

New England coming from 24 behind to beat Denver, 34 – 31.

 

Week 11 – Winner  (To read the Week 11 article, click here.)

Indianapolis coming from 14 behind to beat Tennessee, 30 – 27.

 

Week 10 – Winner  (To read the Week 10 article, click here.)

Minnesota coming from 13 behind to beat Washington, 34 – 27.

 

Week 9 – Winner  (To read the Week 9 article, click here.)

Seattle coming from 21 behind to beat Tampa Bay, 27 – 24.

 

Week 8 – Winners  (To read the Week 8 article, click here.)

New England coming from 14 behind to beat Miami, 27 – 17.

Denver coming from 14 behind to beat Washington, 45 – 21.

 

Week 7 – Winner  (To read the Week 7 article, click here)

New York Jets coming from 11 behind to beat New England, 30 – 27.

 

Week 6 – Winner  (To read the Week 6 article, click here.)

Detroit coming from 10 behind to beat Cleveland, 31 – 17.

 

Week 5 – Winner  (To read the Week 5 article, click here.)

Denver coming from 14 behind to beat Dallas, 51 – 48.

 

Week 4 – Winner  (To read the Week 4 article, click here.)

Seattle coming from 17 behind to beat Houston, 23 – 20.

 

Week 3 – Winner  (To read the Week 3 article, click here.)

Cincinnati coming from 16 behind to beat Green Bay, 34 – 30.

 

Week 2 – Winners  (To read the Week 2 article, click here.)

Buffalo coming from 8 behind to beat Carolina, 24 – 23.

Houston coming from 8 behind to beat Tennessee, 30 – 24.

Arizona coming from 8 behind to beat Detroit, 25 -21.

 

Week 1 – Winner  (To read the Week 1 article, click here.)

Houston coming from 21 behind to beat San Diego, 31 -28.

WEEK 14 – College Football Crisis Management Award Winner

College Football’s Rivalry Week lived up to all the fun and excitement it was hyped to be.  We had close games; gutsy calls; and historical finishes that will be talked about for years to come.  We had unbeaten teams take their first loss; winless teams get their first victory; a major shake-up in the BCS standings; and, our largest come-from-behind victory of the year.  Yes sir, the college football world is abuzz and is likely to stay so throughout Championship Week and into the Bowl Season.  Gosh, I love college football.

We entered Rivalry Week with 5 undefeated teams in FBS football; we leave Rivalry Week with 3 still standing – and some of those on wobbly legs.  Fresno State entered Week 14 at 10 – 0, having had one game (against Colorado) cancelled due to flooding in the area, and, although they scored 52 points and led by 6 points on several occasions in the game, lost by 10 to San Jose State sending their chances at a BCS game down the tubes.  By easily handling Western Michigan on Tuesday night, 33 – 14, Northern Illinois stays standing as the lone BCS buster for 2013.  The Huskies have one more challenge to hurdle, a MAC Championship Game against Bowling Green on Friday night, to finish 13 – 0 and land themselves in a BCS Bowl Game.

Florida State faced off against rival Florida and easily kept their unbeaten season going at 12 – 0 with a convincing, 37 – 7 victory in a game in which they never trailed.  Florida State’s last challenge to remain undefeated and land a spot in the National Championship Game is the ACC Championship Game against the surprising Duke Blue Devils on Saturday Night.

Ohio State survived a huge scare from rival Michigan in a game that included one of the more gutsy calls of the year.  Having scored a potential game-tying touchdown with just 32 seconds left in regulation, Michigan’s Brady Hoke opted to try to a game-winning 2-point-conversion to put an end to the Ohio State two year winning streak.  In rivalry games like this, when you have nothing to lose and can possibly ruin the whole year for your rival, this is the kind of calls you get.  In this case, the Wolverines were unsuccessful on the conversion and the Buckeyes live to play another week as an undefeated team vying for a spot in the National Championship Game.  The Buckeye’s remain challenge is against another team from “up north”, the Michigan State Spartans in the Big Ten Championship Game on Saturday.

And, in what just might be the Game-of-the-Year with what just might be the Ending-Play-of-the-Century, the two-time defending National Champions, Alabama Crimson Tide had their perfect season come to an end on a missed field goal returned for a touchdown in the last second of regulation by the Auburn Tigers.  I could hear screams of joy and shouts of agony emanating from Alabama all the way up here in the state of Washington as I watched the play unfold in amazed disbelief.  What a great Rivalry Week!

The list of undefeated teams has now been whittled down to the following 3 teams:

UNDEFEATED FBS TEAMS

  • Florida State (defeated Idaho, 80 – 14)
  • Northern Illinois (defeated Western Michigan, 33 – 14)
  • Ohio State (defeated Michigan, 42 – 41)

And, we are happy to report, as the season comes to a close for many a team that do not have a 2013 Bowl Game in their future, two teams managed to end an otherwise trying year on a winning note.  After coming so close on numerous occasions throughout the year, only to fall short 11 games in a row, the Hawaii Warriors end their 2013 campaign with a win against the Black Knights of Army.  And, the Golden Eagles from Southern Mississippi got off the two-year snide with a rather convincing 62 – 27 thrashing of UAB to end the nation’s longest losing streak.

Unfortunately, the other two winless teams did not fare so well and ended their years with the same number of wins as they started the year – 0.  Georgia State’s 12th loss came by way of a 38 – 17 beat down by South Alabama and Miami of Ohio’s 12th loss of the year was administered by Ball State, 55 – 14.  Neither winless team ever held a lead in either game.

The two FBS teams that end the 2013 year without a victory are:

WINLESS FBS TEAMS

  • Georgia State (lost to South Alabama, 38 – 17)
  • Miami, OH (lost to Ball State, 55 – 14)

WEEK 14 RECAP

Week 14 of the College Season coincided with Thanksgiving Week this year and consists of numerous end-of-the-year rivalry games that always makes for lots of fun and lots of angst.  Of the 59 FBS games played throughout the week, 27 teams were thankful for a victory in which they never trailed.  Of the 32 games in which the winning team trailed at one point or another in the game, 5 were won by teams that came back from deficits of more than 7 points.  Four teams had to overcome deficits of 14 or more points including two teams that came back from 20 or more points down!

And, on this, the last full season of FBS college football games, the Safe Harbor Consulting College Football Crisis Management Award winner overcame a 24 point deficit – the largest come-from-behind victory of the year!

Iowa State Helmet

IOWA STATE

Iowa StateRivalry games are great.  But, with the changing conference landscape of late and teams going from one conference to another, some rivalries have become distant memories and other rivalries are starting to form.  When the West Virginia Mountaineers moved into the Big 12 Conference they left behind one of the more storied rivalries, the Backyard Brawl, against the University of Pittsburgh, and are looking to find a new rivalry amongst their geographically distanced conference foes.  Perhaps, after the way this game played out, they may have found one.

On paper, this game looked like two teams just playing out the season and waiting to pack it in.  But, in college football, last games of the season are last games of careers for many a senior football player and, nobody playing the last game they may ever play in a sport they have loved for years, just mails it in.  Despite a 2 – 9 Iowa State playing a 4 -7 West Virginia; despite the fact neither team has a chance to earn a Bowl Game birth; despite this not really being a rivalry game between these two, relatively new combatants; this was a game both teams wanted to win – for their pride and for their seniors.  And, this was a game the two teams would play to the end – an end that included 3 overtime periods.  And, this was a game that the victor would overcome the largest deficit faced by an FBS team prior to winning the contest.

The home-standing Mountaineers started this game with a flurry and rushed out to a 1st quarter 17 – 0 lead on a Josh Lambert 49 yard field goal; a Charles Sims 7 yard touchdown run; and, a 38 yard fumble return for a touchdown by Karl Joseph.

The shocked Cyclones did manage to score before the end of the 1st quarter on a 54 yard Grant Rohach touchdown run, but West Virginia added to their lead early in the 2nd quarter.  After a Clint Trickett to Kevin White 17 yard touchdown pass and a Sims long, 76 yard touchdown run, the Mountaineers were on top 31 – 7 and looked to be running away with a season ending victory.  Even with a Rohach to Quenton Bundrage 10 yard touchdown pass making it 31 – 14 at half, it was looking like a long afternoon for the Cyclones.

The 3rd quarter consisted of a few long, time-consuming drives that ended with a blocked field goal and a fumble at the 1 yard line, but no points.  So, Iowa State entered the last quarter of their 2013 football season still trailing the Mountaineers by 17.

Early in the 4th quarter, Iowa State scored on Shontrelle Johnson 3 yard touchdown run to pull within 10, but the Mountaineers responded right back with a 1 play, 76 yard touchdown drive on a pass from Trickett to Mario Alford to push the lead back to 17.  The Cyclones got it back down to 10 on a long touchdown pass of their own from Rohach to Bundrage for 62 yards to make the score 38 – 28.

After recovering a Mountaineer fumble at the West Virginia 38 yard line, Cole Netten connected on a 31 yard field goal to pull the Cyclones within 7 with 4:21 left on the clock and in their season.  When Jacques Washington intercepted a Trickett pass at the West Virginia 33, Iowa State was only 33 yards away from a tying touchdown with 2:46 left to score.  Turns out they only needed 1:46 as Rohach hit Justin Coleman on a 19 yard touchdown pass to, amazingly enough, tie the game in which they once trailed by 24 points.  West Virginia had enough time to move the ball close enough for a last second, hail-Mary shot at the end zone, but Jacques Washington of Iowa State once again came up with the interception and the two teams would extend their last game of the season into overtime.

In the first overtime, both teams connected on field goals: Iowa State’s Netten was good from 41 yards out; and, West Virginia’s Lambert connected from 40 yards out.  In the second overtime period, each team’s offense moved the ball closer to a touchdown, but both settled for 26 yard field goals to keep the game tied.

On the first play of the first possession in the third overtime, Iowa State’s Rohach hit Justin Coleman on a 25 yard touchdown pass and made good on the mandatory 2-point-conversion with a pass from Rohach to E.J. Bibbs.

West Virginia moved the ball down to a first and goal from the 3 yard line, but could not cross the goal line in 4 tries.  And, after trailing by 24 in the 2nd quarter and still down by 17 to start the 4th quarter, the Iowa State Cyclones end their 2013 football season with the largest come-from-behind victory of the year by any FBS team to win the Week 14 Safe Harbor Consulting College Football Crisis Management Award.  Boy, what a game!  Boy, what a week!  Boy, what a year!

Certificate - Week 14 - Iowa State

SAFE HARBOR CONSULTING

Businesses, just like college football teams, can experience huge deficits from business interruption events in which they must rally from behind to stay in the game.  In the area of Crisis Management, game day is the arrival of the tornado; the coming floods; the day the hurricane strikes; a fire; a regional pandemic; technology failures; or any of a variety of risks and threats that can interrupt your business processes and/or the technologies that support them.  And, just like college football teams, your ability to overcome these deficits is directly related to the time and effort you put into planning your strategies and practicing your emergency response, business continuity and disaster recovery plays.

Safe Harbor Consulting has assisted companies and organizations, large and small, in preparing and exercising their crisis management and business continuity playbooks.  To learn more about how Safe Harbor Consulting can help you prepare for your greatest comeback, please visit our website at www.safeharborconsulting.biz; visit us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Safe-Harbor-Consulting/204353729604053; or, call us at (253) 509-0233.

Congratulations once again to the Iowa State Cyclones for overcoming adversity and rallying back from the largest deficit faced by a winning team during Week 14 of the 2013 college football season.

There is still some football left to be played with the Week 15 Conference Championship Games and a few leftover contests for teams from conferences without a Championship Game; the Army Navy game in two weeks; and Bowl Games, BCS Bowl Games and the National Championship game in weeks to come.  For those teams whose seasons are done – thanks for the effort.  For teams who still have games to be played … man, I can’t wait to see what you have in store for us next.

Week 14 – Honorable Mention

Georgia coming from 20 behind to beat Georgia Tech, 41 – 34.

 

Week 13 – Winner  (To read the Week 13 article, click here.)

Connecticut coming from 21 behind to beat Temple, 28 – 21.

 

Week 12 – Winner  (To read the Week 12 article, click here.)

Baylor coming from 14 behind to beat Texas Tech, 63 – 34

 

Week 11 – Winners  (To read the Week 11 article, click here.)

Old Dominion coming from 14 behind to beat Idaho, 59 – 38.

San Diego State coming from 14 behind to beat San Jose State, 34 – 30.

 

Week 10 – Winner  (To read the Week 10 article, click here.)

Louisiana-Lafayette coming from 21 behind to beat New Mexico State, 49 – 35)

 

Week 9 – Winner  (To read the Week 9 article, click here.)

SMU coming from 21 behind to beat Temple, 59 – 49.

 

Week 8 – Winner  (To read the Week 8 article, click here.)

Duke coming from 22 behind to beat Virginia, 35 – 22.

 

Week 7 – Winner  (To read the Week 7 article, click here.)

San Diego State coming from 14 behind to beat Air Force, 27 – 20.

 

Week 6 – Winner  (To read the Week 6 article, click here.)

San Jose State coming from 11 behind to beat Hawaii, 37 – 27.

 

Week 5 – Winner  (To read the Week 5 article, click here.)

San Diego State coming from 16 behind to beat New Mexico State, 26 -16.

 

Week 4 – Winner  (To read the Week 4 article, click here.)

Northern Illinois coming from 20 behind to beat Eastern Illinois, 43 – 39

 

Week 3 – Winner (To read the Week 3 article, click here.)

UNLV coming from 21 behind to beat Central Michigan, 31 – 21

 

Week 2 – Winner (To read the Week 2 article, click here.)

SMU coming from 17 behind to beat Montana State, 31 – 30

 

Week 1 – Winners (To read the Week 1 article, click here.)

North Dakota State coming from 14 behind to beat Kansas State, 24 -21

Troy coming from 14 behind to beat UAB, 34 – 31

Week 12 – Pro Football Crisis Management Award Winner

Some similar challenges just seem more daunting than others due to the circumstances of the incidents.  For example, a power outage caused by a Superstorm Sandy seems more daunting than a power outage caused by overuse during a heat wave.  The same is true in the NFL.  The challenge of overcoming a 24 point deficit by a team being led by your average, everyday quarterback seems a little more doable than the challenge of overcoming a deficit of 24 points to a team with Peyton Manning playing quarterback.  In Week 12 of the NFL, the Safe Harbor Consulting Pro Football Crisis Management Award winner had to overcome that most daunting challenge – trailing the Peyton Manning led Denver Broncos by 24 points at half time!  And, they survived the crisis with an overtime victory.  You just never know.

WEEK 12 RECAP

Week 12 in the NFL is the last week of the season with teams sitting on the sidelines with a bye – from here on out we will have a full slate of 16 games each week.  Week 12’s schedule included 14 games, and, for the first time this year, had one game end in a tie.  Of the 13 games in which we had a winner, 9 were won by the visiting team; 6 games were won by teams that never trailed; and, 3 games were won by teams that overcame a deficit of 11 points or more.

The team that won the Week 12 Safe Harbor Consulting Pro Football Crisis Management Award did so by overcoming the largest deficit of the year thus far – 24 points!  And, they did so by coming back against one of the best teams in the league.

DENVER VS NEW ENGLAND

DEN NEThe 9 – 1 Denver Broncos rode into Foxboro, MA with an impressive offensive season underway and looking to stay on top of the AFC playoff standings against a 7 – 3 New England Patriot team trying to stay on top of the AFC East.  This promised to be one of the better Week 12 games and was set up for a center-stage, Sunday Night National television broadcast.  But, when the Broncos charged out to a 24 – 0 first half lead, and, with Peyton Manning in charge of a highly efficient offensive machine, it is a good bet that TV channels were being changed.

Ironically enough, it was the Denver defense that started off the scoring with a 50 yard touchdown scamper on a fumble recovery by Von Miller.  The defense then got the ball back on another fumble recovery returned to the New England 10 yard line.  Two plays later, Knowshon Moreno ran the ball in from 2 yards out for a 14 – 0 Denver lead.  Later, still in the first quarter, Matt Prater connected on a 27 yard field goal to put Denver up 17 – 0.

The second quarter scoring was limited to a single touchdown scored by the Broncos on a Peyton Manning 10 yard pass to Jacob Tamme.  Going into halftime, trailing the high powered Denver Broncos 24 – 0, is, in football terms, a true crisis.  Any team that overcomes this deficit deserves recognition.

New England started their comeback journey on the first drive of the 3rd quarter.  A Tom Brady 5 yard touchdown pass to Julian Edelman capped off an 8 play, 80 yard drive to put the Patriots on the board.  New England’s defense then got a turnover of their own and set up the offense at the Bronco’s 32 after recovering a fumble.  Six plays and 32 yards later, the Patriots were within 24 – 14 following a Brandon Bolden 1 yard touchdown run.  After stopping the Bronco offense once again, the Patriots put up their third touchdown of the third quarter on a 6 yard pass from Tom Brady to Rob Gronkowski.

After intercepting Manning early in the 4th quarter, the Patriots completed their improbable comeback by taking the lead on a Brady to Edelman, 14 yard touchdown pass.  Amazingly enough, the Patriots were now on top, 28 – 24.  But, there was still some football left to be played.

New England went up by 7 on a 31 yard Stephen Gostkowski field goal, but Peyton Manning had one more drive left in him and tied the game up at 31 – 31 on a late, 4th quarter touchdown pass to Demaryius Thomas from 11 yards out.  Both teams had chances for a game winning drive but were not able to move the ball into field goal range and regulation play ended knotted up at 31.

Denver took the kickoff to start overtime but stalled out on their own 42.  Failing to score on the first possession of overtime, the game was now in sudden death mode.  New England was unable to move the ball on their first overtime possession and had to punt the ball back to the ever-dangerous Peyton ManningDenver did move the ball from their own 13 across midfield, but could not quit reach field goal range and punted the ball back to New England.  The Patriots had no success moving the ball and, once again, punted back to Denver.  This time, however, the punt was muffed and recovered by New England at the Bronco 13 where Gotkowski lined up for a field goal on 3rd down and won the game to finish the miraculous come-from-behind victory over the Denver Broncos and secure the Week 12 Safe Harbor Consulting Pro Football Crisis Management Award.

SAFE HARBOR CONSULTING

To learn more about how Safe Harbor Consulting can help you prepare for your greatest comeback, please visit our website at www.safeharborconsulting.biz; visit us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Safe-Harbor-Consulting/204353729604053; or, call us at (253) 509-0233.

Week 11 – Winner  (To read the Week 11 article, click here.)

Indianapolis coming from 14 behind to beat Tennessee, 30 – 27.

 

Week 10 – Winner  (To read the Week 10 article, click here.)

Minnesota coming from 13 behind to beat Washington, 34 – 27.

 

Week 9 – Winner  (To read the Week 9 article, click here.)

Seattle coming from 21 behind to beat Tampa Bay, 27 – 24.

 

Week 8 – Winners  (To read the Week 8 article, click here.)

New England coming from 14 behind to beat Miami, 27 – 17.

Denver coming from 14 behind to beat Washington, 45 – 21.

 

Week 7 – Winner  (To read the Week 7 article, click here)

New York Jets coming from 11 behind to beat New England, 30 – 27.

 

Week 6 – Winner  (To read the Week 6 article, click here.)

Detroit coming from 10 behind to beat Cleveland, 31 – 17.

 

Week 5 – Winner  (To read the Week 5 article, click here.)

Denver coming from 14 behind to beat Dallas, 51 – 48.

 

Week 4 – Winner  (To read the Week 4 article, click here.)

Seattle coming from 17 behind to beat Houston, 23 – 20.

 

Week 3 – Winner  (To read the Week 3 article, click here.)

Cincinnati coming from 16 behind to beat Green Bay, 34 – 30.

 

Week 2 – Winners  (To read the Week 2 article, click here.)

                Buffalo coming from 8 behind to beat Carolina, 24 – 23.

                Houston coming from 8 behind to beat Tennessee, 30 – 24.

Arizona coming from 8 behind to beat Detroit, 25 -21.

 

Week 1 – Winner  (To read the Week 1 article, click here.)

Houston coming from 21 behind to beat San Diego, 31 -28.

WEEK 13 – College Football Crisis Management Award Winner

Believe it or not, we are already nearing the end of the 2013 College Football Season – seems like we only just got started.

In Week 13, both the list of Undefeated Teams and the list of Winless Teams were trimmed down by one with a few other close calls.  The undefeated team that gets removed from our list is the Baylor Bears who lost to Oklahoma State, 49 – 17, in a game that they never led; lost their chance at an undefeated season; and, lost all hopes of being in the National Championship Game.  Northern Illinois remained undefeated by besting Toledo, 35 – 17, in a game in which they trailed by 3 points early in the contest.  Alabama, Florida State, Fresno State and Ohio State all remain on the list of undefeated teams with easy victories in games in which they never trailed.

The list of undefeated teams now includes the following 5 names:

UNDEFEATED FBS TEAMS

  • Alabama (defeated Chattanooga, 49 – 0)
  • Florida State (defeated Idaho, 80 – 14)
  • Fresno State (defeated New Mexico, 69 – 28)
  • Northern Illinois (defeated Toledo, 35 – 17)
  • Ohio State (defeated Indiana, 42 – 14)

For our winless teams, there were a few close games and one team which, finally, gets a taste of victory for 2013.  Georgia State put up a good fight against Arkansas State but failed on a two point conversion that would have tied the game late in the fourth quarter and lost its 11th game on the year, 35 – 33.  For the second week in a row, the Hawaii Warriors took their game into overtime in search of their first win on the season, but lost to Wyoming, 59 – 56 in a see-saw battle that had the lead change hands some 8 times.  Miami of Ohio took another early week thumping; this time, a Tuesday Night, 44 – 7, loss to Buffalo.  And, Southern Miss was doubled up by Middle Tennessee, 42 – 21 in a game in which they never held the lead.

But, in the contest that would become the Week 13 Safe Harbor Consulting College Football Crisis Management Award winning game, the Connecticut Huskies overcame a 21 point halftime deficit to the Temple Owls to secure their first victory in 2013 and remove their name from the winless teams list.

The list of winless FBS teams now stands as follows:

WINLESS FBS TEAMS

  • Georgia State (lost to Arkansas State, 35 – 33)
  • Hawaii (lost to Wyoming, 59 – 56, in OT)
  • Miami (OH) (lost to Buffalo, 44 – 7)
  • Southern Mississippi (lost to Middle Tennessee, 42 – 21)

WEEK 13 RECAP

For some reason, Week 13 in College Football included an unusually high number of FBS vs FCS games for this late in the season, including one game in which the FCS member embarrassed a team from a BCS automatic qualifying conference.  Just when you think Will Muschamp’s head coaching seat couldn’t get any hotter, the Eagles from Georgia Southern light it on fire by beating Florida, 26 – 20, for their 6th straight loss and making them ineligible for a bowl game in 2013.

With 59 games on the slate with at least one FBS team participating, 36 games were won by teams that never trailed – the highest total since Week 4.  Of the 23 games in which the winning team trailed at one point or another in the game, 8 of them were won by teams that trailed by more than one score (more than 8 points), including a team that won for the first time in 2013.  In fact, that first time winner not only removed its name from the list of winless teams, but, by coming back from 21 points down before securing the victory, the Connecticut Huskies also became the Week 13 winner of the Safe Harbor Consulting College Football Crisis Management Award.

connecticut-huskies-replica-mini-helmet-3349320

CONNECTICUT

Uconn HuskiesIt was only 3 seasons ago that the Connecticut Huskies were representing the Big East Conference in a BCS bowl game (Fiesta Bowl vs. Oklahoma).  Now, only three years later, in a much watered-down, revamped Big East Football Conference with a new name – the American Athletic Conference – the Huskies were at rock bottom of the conference and facing a potential undefeated season.  They road into Philadelphia to face the 1 – 9 Temple Owls in a game which looked like they might have a chance, but that flickering flame of hope didn’t burn too bright in the first half of that contest.

With hopes of finally getting a win in 2013, Connecticut found themselves, once again trailing in a football against an opponent they looked, at least on paper, to be equally matched-up against.  But, Temple scored the game’s first touchdown near the end of the first quarter on a P. J. Walker 6 yard run and then added two more in the second quarter – a Walker to Robbie Anderson 8 yard pass and a Zaire Williams 18 yard run – to take a seemingly commanding 21 – 0 lead into halftime.

With the season coming to a close; with an interim Head Coach making the calls following the in-season firing of your other Head Coach; holding an 0 – 10 record; and, trailing 21 – 0 at half – you wouldn’t expect a whole lot of fight left in your team.  But, to the credit of these young men from Connecticut, you couldn’t be more wrong.

The Huskies started their march to victory number 1 in 2013 on the first series of the second half.  On the sixth play of the drive, Casey Cochran tossed a 33 yard touchdown pass to Geremy Davis to remove the 0 from their side of the scoreboard.  Later in that same quarter, Max DeLorenzo ran the ball in from 4 yards out to bring the Huskies to within a touchdown at 21 – 14.  Their first drive of the 4th quarter ended with 1 yard Cochran touchdown run to tie the game and, when Yawin Smallwood returned an interception 59 yards for a defensive touchdown, the Huskies were able to remove the 0 from their win column.

Considering everything else that has happened to the Huskies in 2013, it was a rather amazing feat to come from 21 points down to get their first victory.  Now, with only one game remaining on the year, they have a chance to end 2013 on a two-game winning streak.  And, not only did they get their first victory in Week 13, they also earn recognition as the Safe Harbor College Football Crisis Management Award winners.  Congratulations Huskies.

Certificate - Week 13 - UConn

SAFE HARBOR CONSULTING

Businesses, just like college football teams, can experience huge deficits from business interruption events in which they must rally from behind to stay in the game.  In the area of Crisis Management, game day is the arrival of the tornado; the coming floods; the day the hurricane strikes; a fire; a regional pandemic; technology failures; or any of a variety of risks and threats that can interrupt your business processes and/or the technologies that support them.  And, just like college football teams, your ability to overcome these deficits is directly related to the time and effort you put into planning your strategies and practicing your emergency response, business continuity and disaster recovery plays.

Safe Harbor Consulting has assisted companies and organizations, large and small, in preparing and exercising their crisis management and business continuity playbooks.  To learn more about how Safe Harbor Consulting can help you prepare for your greatest comeback, please visit our website at www.safeharborconsulting.biz; visit us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Safe-Harbor-Consulting/204353729604053; or, call us at (253) 509-0233.

Congratulations once again to the Connecticut Huskies for overcoming adversity and rallying back from the largest deficit faced by a winning team during Week 13 of the 2013 college football season.   Not only do we have just two more weeks left in the 2013 College Football season, but we also have only two more weeks in the BCS era.  Could we possibly end the BCS era, prior to going into a mini-playoff format, with 3 undefeated teams from Major Conferences?  We have some rivalry games and conference championship games to play before we find out.  I kind of hope it resolves itself and we don’t end with controversy – but, then on the other hand …

Week 13 – Honorable Mention

Duke coming from 14 behind to beat Wake Forest, 28 – 21.

Iowa coming from 14 behind to beat Michigan, 24 – 21.

 

Week 12 – Winner (To read the Week 12 article, click here.)

Baylor coming from 14 behind to beat Texas Tech, 63 – 34

 

Week 11 – Winners  (To read the Week 11 article, click here.)

Old Dominion coming from 14 behind to beat Idaho, 59 – 38.

San Diego State coming from 14 behind to beat San Jose State, 34 – 30.

 

Week 10 – Winner  (To read the Week 10 article, click here.)

Louisiana-Lafayette coming from 21 behind to beat New Mexico State, 49 – 35)

 

Week 9 – Winner  (To read the Week 9 article, click here.)

SMU coming from 21 behind to beat Temple, 59 – 49.

 

Week 8 – Winner  (To read the Week 8 article, click here.)

Duke coming from 22 behind to beat Virginia, 35 – 22.

 

Week 7 – Winner  (To read the Week 7 article, click here.)

San Diego State coming from 14 behind to beat Air Force, 27 – 20.

 

Week 6 – Winner  (To read the Week 6 article, click here.)

San Jose State coming from 11 behind to beat Hawaii, 37 – 27.

 

Week 5 – Winner  (To read the Week 5 article, click here.)

San Diego State coming from 16 behind to beat New Mexico State, 26 -16.

 

Week 4 – Winner  (To read the Week 4 article, click here.)

Northern Illinois coming from 20 behind to beat Eastern Illinois, 43 – 39

 

Week 3 – Winner (To read the Week 3 article, click here.)

UNLV coming from 21 behind to beat Central Michigan, 31 – 21

 

Week 2 – Winner (To read the Week 2 article, click here.)

SMU coming from 17 behind to beat Montana State, 31 – 30

 

Week 1 – Winners (To read the Week 1 article, click here.)

North Dakota State coming from 14 behind to beat Kansas State, 24 -21

Troy coming from 14 behind to beat UAB, 34 – 31

Week 11 – Pro Football Crisis Management Award Winner

Week 11 in the NFL was a good week for home cooking – 12 home teams were winners and only 3 visiting teams got a victory.  The three home teams that took a lost each held the lead at one point or another in their game.  And, the three losing home teams are all last place teams in their respective divisions.

For the second week in a row, the first game of the week, played on Thursday Night, put up a comeback margin that could not be exceeded by any of the teams playing on Sunday or Monday.

WEEK 11 RECAP

There were 15 NFL games played in Week 11.  Of those 15 games, 9 were won by teams that trailed at one point or another in the game.  All 6 teams that never trailed in the game were home teams and 6 of the 9 teams that overcame a deficit were home teams.  It was a good week to be playing at home.

Week 11 included three games in which the winning team overcame a deficit of 10 points or more.  And, for the second week in a row, the Safe Harbor Pro Football Crisis Management Award Winner comes from the Thursday Night Game.

INDIANAPOLIS VS TENNESSEE

IND TENWeek 11’s Thursday Night Game featured an intra-divisional affair providing the Tennessee Titans an opportunity to stay within shouting distance of the division-leading Indianapolis Colts.  The Colts have been playing a little inconsistent of late and have found themselves trailing early in several games – a few that they came-from-behind to win; and, a few that they were never in the game.  Thursday Night would be more of the same.

The Titans started off the game with an 8 play, 80 yard touchdown drive capped off by a Chris Johnson 30 yard touchdown run through a hole over right tackle.  After holding the Colts to a 3-and-out, the Titans followed up with an 11 play, 68 yard drive that ended on a Johnson 7 yard touchdown run, giving the Titans a quick 14 – 0 lead.  This made it 3rd weeks in a row that the Colts gave up 14 or more points before getting on the scoreboard.

In the second quarter of this game, the teams alternated scoring field goals: first, the Colt’s Adam Venatieri hit from 48 yards out; then, Tennessee’s Rob Bironas connected on a 25 yarder; and, lastly, Venatieri was good again from 30 yards out.  As the teams went into the halftime locker rooms, the Titans were holding the lead at 17 – 6.

The Colts got the 3rd quarter going with an 11 play, 74 yard drive that ended with a Donald Brown 6 yard touchdown run around left end to make the score 17 – 13.  When Tennessee’s Devon Wiley fumbled the kickoff and Indianapolis’ Dan Herron recovered at the Titian’s 20, the Colts found the end-zone again two plays later on an Andrew Luck 11 yard scramble, touchdown run, giving the Colts the lead at 20 – 17.  A 50 yard Venatieri field goal on their next possession bumped the Colts’ lead up to 23 – 17 as the teams entered the 4th quarter.

A Titans’ field goal early in the 4th quarter brought Tennessee to within 3, at 23 – 20.  After exchanging punts, the Colts went on an 11 play, 80 yard drive culminating with an 11 yard touchdown run by Brown putting the Colts back up by 10.

Tennessee managed to score a late touchdown on a Ryan Fitzpatrick to Delanie Walker 19 yard touchdown pass.  But, when the Titans failed to recover the on-sides kick, the Colts were able to secure the victory and become the Week 11 Safe Harbor Consulting Pro Football Crisis Management Award winner.

SAFE HARBOR CONSULTING

To learn more about how Safe Harbor Consulting can help you prepare for your greatest comeback, please visit our website at www.safeharborconsulting.biz; visit us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Safe-Harbor-Consulting/204353729604053; or, call us at (253) 509-0233.

Week 10 – Winner  (To read the Week 10 article, click here.)

Minnesota coming from 13 behind to beat Washington, 34 – 27.

 

Week 9 – Winner  (To read the Week 9 article, click here.)

Seattle coming from 21 behind to beat Tampa Bay, 27 – 24.

 

Week 8 – Winners  (To read the Week 8 article, click here.)

New England coming from 14 behind to beat Miami, 27 – 17.

Denver coming from 14 behind to beat Washington, 45 – 21.

 

Week 7 – Winner  (To read the Week 7 article, click here)

New York Jets coming from 11 behind to beat New England, 30 – 27.

 

Week 6 – Winner  (To read the Week 6 article, click here.)

Detroit coming from 10 behind to beat Cleveland, 31 – 17.

 

Week 5 – Winner  (To read the Week 5 article, click here.)

Denver coming from 14 behind to beat Dallas, 51 – 48.

 

Week 4 – Winner  (To read the Week 4 article, click here.)

Seattle coming from 17 behind to beat Houston, 23 – 20.

 

Week 3 – Winner  (To read the Week 3 article, click here.)

Cincinnati coming from 16 behind to beat Green Bay, 34 – 30.

 

Week 2 – Winners  (To read the Week 2 article, click here.)

Buffalo coming from 8 behind to beat Carolina, 24 – 23.

Houston coming from 8 behind to beat Tennessee, 30 – 24.

Arizona coming from 8 behind to beat Detroit, 25 -21.

 

Week 1 – Winner  (To read the Week 1 article, click here.)

Houston coming from 21 behind to beat San Diego, 31 -28.