Risk Analysis: The Nuclear Power Plant Threat

I am in the process of creating an Emergency Response Facilitated Exercise for one of Safe Harbor Consulting’s prestigious clients who has elected to simulate a nuclear power plant crisis near one of their strategic corporate locations.  My research on this topic has uncovered some rather disturbing information.

Currently, the US standard is to establish an evacuation zone of 10 miles, yet in the wake of the Fukushima, tsunami induced crisis, the US government ordered the evacuation of US citizens within 50 miles of the site.  The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) suggests that they would do the same should a similar event happen in the US.  Then why not expand the standard evacuation zone that nuclear sites currently are told to plan for?

Furthermore, my research suggest that information concerning the expected time to evacuate from nearby nuclear power plants is based on old and outdated population figures.  This is disturbing to me – what are your thoughts on this?

This web site shows the active nuclear power plants and the population counts nearby.  Realizing how many plants were in the path of Hurricane Irene is pretty scary.  Sure these facilities are hardened and built to withstand most weather and geological threats, but still – a breach at any one of these plants could be devastating.

Now, I do not want to come across as a fear monger – just wondering how many of you include the possibility of evacuation caused by a nuclear power plant compromise as part of your risk analysis?  If doing so, I would use the 50 mile radius precedent established by the Fukushima catastrophe as my measuring stick and not the official 10 mile radius established by the NRC.

Now back to planning the exercise.  Maybe in a future blog I can relate how it went.

Thank you for your input.